Tuesday, October 31, 2017

7 Things About Breast Cancer Research You Need to Know

7 Things About Breast Cancer Research You Need to Know
7 Things About Breast Cancer Research You Need to Know - Breast cancer is a frightening disease for women. However, there is a glimmer of hope to prevent this disease. Did you know that breast cancer death rates have decreased by 38% since 1989?

"Thanks to advances in detection and treatment, women not only live longer, they also require less invasive surgery and therapy," said Theresa Bevers, MD, medical director of the Cancer Prevention Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, USA. Launched from the Health page, some of these things you need to know about the latest news from breast cancer.


Based on breast cancer research

Diet plays a role in the prevention of breast cancer

Awareness of women to live healthier, seems to be an important factor in the prevention of breast cancer. According to a study published in March this year, postmenopausal women whose diets approached the Mediterranean diet were 40% less likely to develop estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

Not only that, most women follow a plant-based diet, have a 15% lower risk of developing breast cancer, compared with women who follow the least, according to a study in 2013 at The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

"This may be partly due to the fact that the plant-based diet is rich in phytonutrients and antioxidants that can protect the body from cancer," Dr. Bevers.
So there's no reason to ignore fresh vegetables, fruits, peas, and seeds.


Not everyone needs surgery

Each year, more than 50,000 American women are diagnosed with in situ ductal carcinoma (DCIS) in which abnormal cells are found in the milk duct in the breast. You could say DCIS is the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer (not yet spread). Usually those diagnosed with DCIS, treated with a mastectomy or lumpectomy (often, but not always, this therapy is paired with radiation).

However, a 2015 study in JAMA Surgery found that women with low-grade DCIS who did not undergo surgery had a similar survival rate. And new trials in several cancer centers in the US will compare the results in women with DCIS who undergo surgery, with those who will be closely watched, with regular doctor visits and mammograms.

"Women need to know that DCIS has levels, from low to higher potency to advanced to invasive cancer," explained Grace Smith, MD, a radiation oncologist at MD Anderson Cancer Center. While most surgeons still recommend a mastectomy or lumpectomy for middle or high grade DCIS, some practitioners may allow active supervision for low grade DCIS.

So basically, "Mastectomy or lumpectomy is still regarded as a standard of care," said Dr. Smith. But if patients are concerned, they may consider talking to the doctor about the nonsurgical active surveillance option being investigated.


Diagnose early

As mammography becomes more familiar, DCIS is more common than in the past. Women are rarely diagnosed with DCIS after they have found lumps or other changes in the breast, such as discharge from the nipple.

DCIS is often seen as a pattern of calcification (micro accumulation) in the mammogram. Although the existing form and size of calcification is suspected as DCIS by radiologists, further examination is still needed. Usually doctors will advise patients to do core needle biopsy, by taking a bit of tissue with a needle, under the influence of local anesthesia. Examples of such tissues are then sent to a pathologist. Diagnosis can also be done with an open surgical biopsy.

Mammograms are still important

Mammograms have been around for almost half a century, but there is still controversy, although it has consistently been shown to reduce breast cancer deaths. While groups such as the American Cancer Society, the US Preventive Services Task Force, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists agree that women should undergo this life-saving X-ray. They are divided into when women should start doing mammograms, and how often they should do it.

So essentially there is no definite guideline other than a recommendation from your doctor. To know when to do a mammogram and need to do it every year, talk to your doctor-at least when you're 40, or earlier, if you have a family history of cancer.


Breast cancer research is progressing

The latest breast cancer research is immunotherapy, a type of treatment that utilizes its own immune response to blast cancer cells. It is very promising to treat triple-negative breast cancer, a very aggressive type.

But other breakthroughs have helped cut mortality, including targeted therapies for HER2-positive breast cancer (about 20 percent of women with breast cancer have this type of aggressive) and a class of drugs called CDK4 / 6 inhibitors, which help remove one type of breast cancer at an advanced stage by blocking cell proteins that allow tumors to grow.This progress is likely to increase survival rates for years to come.


Genetic test

Nearly 10% of all breast cancers are caused by mutations in two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are also associated with ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate cancers. Genetic testing can also look for other gene mutations that increase the risk of breast cancer, such as PALB2. Doctors do not recommend screening for all women, but according to Mary Freivogel, president of the Society of Genetic Counselor, if you have the conditions below, you should do a genetic test:

1. You are diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 45, or with triple-negative breast cancer before age 60, or with ovarian cancer at any age.

2. You have family members with BRCA1 / 2 mutations.

3. You have the following family history: two or more siblings with breast or pancreas, one relative with ovarian cancer, diagnosed relatively younger than 50 years of age, or a case of male breast cancer.


Things that will not trigger breast cancer risk

You do not have to worry, this will not make your breast cancer risk.
  •  IVF. A 2016 study of more than 25,000 women found no increased risk in those who had undergone in vitro fertilization or IVF.
  •  Drinking coffee. If anything, it may lower your postmenopausal risk, says a study in 2015.
  • Stress. Breast cancer research in 2016 in the United Kingdom revealed that women who were continuously stressed for the previous five years, had no higher risk than those who had never or sometimes experienced stress.
  • Bra. No matter the size, type, or how often you use it: The 2014 study examined 1,044 postmenopausal women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer and concluded that the habit of wearing a bra had no effect.

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